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Public Health Department
Published on October 24th, 2014 by Sandy Ellington @ 9:14 am

The Evans-Blount Community Health Center located at 2031 Martin Luther King, Jr. Drive in Greensboro will celebrate its fourth anniversary by hosting a community event on November 1, 2014 from 10:00 a.m. until 3:00 p.m.  A variety of fun and interactive events will be available for the community as well as valuable health screening and information co-sponsored by The Health Insurance Store.  Plan to join in the celebration on November 1st and come see how fun being healthy can be!

 

Published on October 21st, 2014 by Connie Lawson @ 4:16 pm

The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa.  More recently, the first travel-associated case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States was confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on September 30, 2014, an event that has understandably led to an increased level of concern in the general public.
Although the risk of an Ebola outbreak in the U.S. is very low, the CDC, the NC Department of Health and Human Services (NC DHHS) and the Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services (GCDHHS), along with key community partners, are taking steps to keep this from happening.
For instance, GCDHHS (Division of Public Health) in conjunction with state and federal agencies, local health care systems, and Guilford County Emergency Services are actively monitoring for cases using a variety of methods, including surveillance of hospital emergency department visits and outpatient clinic visits.  Guilford County Public Health has been working closely with local hospitals and other public health partners, including healthcare providers and emergency responders throughout the county to coordinate a comprehensive management plan in the event that an Ebola case were to occur in the area. Therefore, if an Ebola case occurred in Guilford County, state and local public health professionals would rapidly identify everyone who was potentially exposed and take immediate measures to prevent further spread. Both state and local public health professionals have extensive training and experience with this type of investigation and response. To date, no cases of Ebola have been identified in North Carolina.
So what do you need to know about the Ebola virus?  Dr. Laura Bachmann, Public Health’s Medical Director and a Professor of Infectious Diseases at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, stresses the following reminders:
• A person infected with Ebola cannot spread the disease until symptoms appear.  Symptoms or signs of the disease appear from 2 to 21 days after exposure though the average time from exposure to symptoms is 8 to 10 days.
• Symptoms of Ebola include fever, severe headache, muscle pain, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea or unexplained bleeding or bruising.
• Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or through mucous membranes such as can be found in the eyes, nose or mouth) with blood or body fluids of a person who is sick with Ebola, and through direct contact with objects like needles or syringes that have been contaminated with the blood and body fluids of a person sick with Ebola.
• Ebola is NOT spread through the air, through water or through food.
What can you do to protect yourself from Ebola? Dr. Bachmann endorses the current CDC guidance which includes the following steps:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
• Do not touch the blood or body fluids (for example, urine, feces, saliva, vomit, sweat and semen) of people who are sick.
• Do not handle items that may have come in contact with a sick person’s blood or body fluids and do not touch the body of someone who has died of Ebola.
Finally, Dr. Bachmann advises the following, “Keep in mind that we are getting into cold and flu season and that many people will have similar symptoms from much more common illnesses – not Ebola!  Get your flu shot and other recommended vaccinations.  Do not go to work or school if you are sick. Check in with your health care provider should you become ill and make sure to tell your health care provider if you have traveled recently from a country where the Ebola outbreak is ongoing or if you have possibly had contact with a person infected with Ebola.”
For more information and updates, contact Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health at (336) 641-6500.

 

Published on October 17th, 2014 by Sandy Ellington @ 8:25 am

The Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services is alerting residents that a raccoon found on Kearns Avenue in High Point tested positive for the rabies virus on October 16, 2014.  This is the ninth confirmed case of animal rabies in 2014. The raccoon exposed one dog.
North Carolina law requires that all domestic pets (cats, dogs and ferrets), whether living inside or outside, age four months or older be vaccinated.  Even animals that are confined in outdoor fenced areas should have current rabies vaccinations, because wild animals can get into these areas and attack your pets.
Rabies continues to circulate within our wildlife population. The best way to protect your family and your pet’s safety is to vaccinate your pets against rabies.  Guilford County Animal Control is offering a low-cost rabies vaccination clinic at:
Saturday, October 18, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Jamestown Town Hall, 301 East Main Street, Jamestown, NC  27282
The rabies vaccination will be five dollars ($5.00) per shot.  Cash and personal checks will be accepted.
For your pet’s safety and the safety of others at these clinics, dogs must be leashed and cats must be in carriers.
For more information or to schedule an educational program, please contact the Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services at (336)641-7777, Guilford County Animal Control at (336) 641-5990 or visit www.guilfordhealth.org

 

Published on October 8th, 2014 by Sandy Ellington @ 9:58 am

The 2014 Ebola epidemic is the largest in history, affecting multiple countries in West Africa.  More recently, the first travel-associated case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States was confirmed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) on September 30, 2014, an event that has understandably led to an increased level of concern in the general public.
Although the risk of an Ebola outbreak in the U.S. is very low, the CDC, the NC Department of Health and Human Services (NC DHHS) and the Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services (GCDHHS), along with key community partners, are taking steps to keep this from happening.
For instance, GCDHHS (Division of Public Health) in conjunction with state and federal agencies, local health care systems, and Guilford County Emergency Services are actively monitoring for cases using a variety of methods, including surveillance of hospital emergency department visits and outpatient clinic visits.  Guilford County Public Health has been working closely with local hospitals and other public health partners, including healthcare providers and emergency responders throughout the county to coordinate a comprehensive management plan in the event that an Ebola case were to occur in the area. Therefore, if an Ebola case occurred in Guilford County, state and local public health professionals would rapidly identify everyone who was potentially exposed and take immediate measures to prevent further spread. Both state and local public health professionals have extensive training and experience with this type of investigation and response. To date, no cases of Ebola have been identified in North Carolina.
So what do you need to know about the Ebola virus?  Dr. Laura Bachmann, Public Health’s Medical Director and a Professor of Infectious Diseases at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center, stresses the following reminders:
• A person infected with Ebola cannot spread the disease until symptoms appear.  Symptoms or signs of the disease appear from 2 to 21 days after exposure though the average time from exposure to symptoms is 8 to 10 days.
• Symptoms of Ebola include fever, severe headache, muscle pain, vomiting, stomach pain, diarrhea or unexplained bleeding or bruising.
• Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or through mucous membranes such as can be found in the eyes, nose or mouth) with blood or body fluids of a person who is sick with Ebola, and through direct contact with objects like needles or syringes that have been contaminated with the blood and body fluids of a person sick with Ebola.
• Ebola is NOT spread through the air, through water or through food.
What can you do to protect yourself from Ebola? Dr. Bachmann endorses the current CDC guidance which includes the following steps:
• Wash your hands often with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer.
• Do not touch the blood or body fluids (for example, urine, feces, saliva, vomit, sweat and semen) of people who are sick.
• Do not handle items that may have come in contact with a sick person’s blood or body fluids and do not touch the body of someone who has died of Ebola.
Finally, Dr. Bachmann advises the following, “Keep in mind that we are getting into cold and flu season and that many people will have similar symptoms from much more common illnesses – not Ebola!  Get your flu shot and other recommended vaccinations.  Do not go to work or school if you are sick. Check in with your health care provider should you become ill and make sure to tell your health care provider if you have traveled recently from a country where the Ebola outbreak is ongoing or if you have possibly had contact with a person infected with Ebola.”
For more information and updates, contact Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services, Division of Public Health at (336) 641-6500.

 
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