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Public Health Department
Viewing the 'DPH Latest News' Category
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Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

 The Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services is alerting residents that a bat found on Quaker Landing Road in Greensboro tested positive for the rabies virus on July 2, 2014.  This is the fourth confirmed case of animal rabies in 2014.  The bat exposed one dog.
North Carolina law requires that all domestic pets (cats, dogs and ferrets), whether living inside or outside, age four months or older be vaccinated.  Even animals that are confined in outdoor fenced areas should have current rabies vaccinations, because wild animals can get into these areas and attack your pets.
Rabies continues to circulate within our wildlife population. The best way to protect your family and your pet’s safety is to vaccinate your pets against rabies.  Guilford County Animal Control is offering low-cost rabies vaccination clinics at the following locations and times:
Saturday, August 23, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Fire District #28, 6619 NC 61 North,     Gibsonville, NC 27249
Saturday, September 27, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m., Pleasant Garden Town Hall, 4920     Alliance Church Road, Pleasant Garden, NC 27313
Saturday, October 18, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Jamestown Town Hall, 301 East Main     Street, Jamestown, NC  27282
The rabies vaccination will be five dollars ($5.00) per shot.  Cash and personal checks will be accepted.
For your pet’s safety and the safety of others at these clinics, dogs must be leashed and cats must be in carriers.
For more information or to schedule an educational program, please contact the Guilford County Department of Public Health at (336)641-7777, Guilford County Animal Control at (336) 641-5990 or visit www.guilfordhealth.org
                                            


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Wednesday, July 2nd, 2014

Guilford County Animal Control (GCAC) is reminding residents that leaving pets in parked, locked vehicles in warm or hot weather could be very dangerous for the animal.
According to the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (ASPCA), it only takes ten minutes on an 85-degree day for the inside of your car to reach 102 degrees, even if the windows have been left open an inch or two.  Within 30 minutes, the automobile interior can reach 120 degrees.  Even when the temperature outside is 70 degrees, the inside car temperature may be as much as 20 degrees hotter.  GCAC reminds pet owners that leaving the windows cracked or leaving water in the vehicle for the pet to drink is not sufficient to keep the animal safe in the vehicle.  Animals may not sweat so their body temperature heats up quickly making them at risk of overheating (hyperthermia), heatstroke and death.
GCAC strongly encourages residents to leave their pets at home in warm weather. Leaving an animal in a hot vehicle is not only unfair and unsafe for the animal but may end in damage to the vehicle or animal cruelty citations.  GCAC officers will take measures to rescue an animal found in a closed locked vehicle, and will involve law enforcement if necessary for the pet’s well being.  GCAC will also attempt to educate the owner regarding the dangers of pets in vehicles.
Pets need fresh water daily, food and secure shelter and should be protected from heat-related injuries just as people do.  Pets should not be left in closed, locked vehicles even for a few minutes. Doing so may result in fatal consequences for your pet.
For more information, call Guilford County Animal Control at (336) 641-5990.


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Thursday, June 19th, 2014

The Guilford County Child Fatality Prevention Team/Community Child Protection Team
(CFPT/CCPT) will present its 12th annual “Safety Makes Cents,” award to the VIP FOR A VIP INC at the team’s June 19th meeting beginning at 3:00 p.m.

The mission of the VIP for a VIP program is to bring the sight, sounds and smell of a fatal vehicle accident to high school students in a dramatic way in hopes of embedding the consequences of these often senseless events into the minds of teenage drivers.  VIP for a VIP programs are usually delivered to high school juniors and seniors in the spring around prom time and in the fall around homecoming. The program focuses on young drivers and the choices they will have to make while driving, such as:

• Driving while impaired.
• Using a cell phone or text messaging
• Allowing distractions in the vehicle (loud music, radio adjustment, partying, etc).
• Driving over the posted speed limit.
• Playing games with another driver (racing).
• Driving or riding in a vehicle with more people than available seat belts.
• Riding on top or in the back of a vehicle (car surfing)
• Driving faster than road conditions should allow (inclement weather).

The “Safety Makes Cents” award is an annual monetary citation in the amount of $1,000 for outstanding work in the field of childhood injury prevention.

Individuals or groups representing agencies, businesses, coalitions, organization or clubs within Guilford County with proven injury prevention efforts in reducing child fatalities may apply for the annual $1,000 award.  Funds must be used to further the winning group’s efforts.

For more information on the award or the CFPT/CCPT, call Lisa Alexander at the Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services at 641-6130.
                                                                                         


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Monday, June 16th, 2014

The Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services is alerting residents that a raccoon found on Weston Drive in Greensboro tested positive for the rabies virus on June 13, 2014.  This is the third confirmed case of animal rabies in 2014.  The raccoon exposed one dog.
North Carolina law requires that all domestic pets (cats, dogs and ferrets), whether living inside or outside, age four months or older be vaccinated.  Even animals that are confined in outdoor fenced areas should have current rabies vaccinations, because wild animals can get into these areas and attack your pets.
Rabies continues to circulate within our wildlife population. The best way to protect your family and your pet’s safety is to vaccinate your pets against rabies.  Guilford County Animal Control is offering low-cost rabies vaccination clinics at the following locations and times:
Saturday, June 21, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Summerfield Fire Station #9, 7400 Summerfield Road, Summerfield, NC 27358
Saturday, August 23, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Fire District #28, 6619 NC 61 North, Gibsonville, NC 27249
Saturday, September 27, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to Guilford County Confirms Third Case of Animal Rabies in 2014 (Health Alert)
1:00 p.m., Pleasant Garden Town Hall, 4920     Alliance Church Road, Pleasant Garden, NC 27313
Saturday, October 18, 2014, 9:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., Jamestown Town Hall, 301 East Main Street, Jamestown, NC  27282
The rabies vaccination will be five dollars ($5.00) per shot.  Cash and personal checks will be accepted.
For your pet’s safety and the safety of others at these clinics, dogs must be leashed and cats must be in carriers.
For more information or to schedule an educational program, please contact the Guilford County Department of Health and Human Services at (336)641-7777, Guilford County Animal Control at (336) 641-5990 or visit www.guilfordhealth.org


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